Seriously seedy

One challenge of adding different things to different breads is the number of partially opened packets of Stuff that clutter up the kitchen. I bought poppyseeds for my hugely successful challah a year ago and I haven’t used them since, and even putting flax seeds into my morning oatmeal isn’t making much of a dent in the large pack I bought for $2.50 a while ago. So my latest bread experiment was designed to use some of those seeds up, plus sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and a few hemp hearts (which may, or may not, count as a seed).

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I used honey for the sweetener, olive oil for the fat, added some of the liquid that pools to the top in a pot of unflavored Greek yogurt to my warm water and kneaded it all together to get ready for the bake. Flour was a mix of stone-ground organic white, stone-ground organic wholewheat, stone ground organic spelt and rye, because it’s what I had in the pantry.

Then crisis. Counting back to when I had to leave (friend and I had opera tickets for last night), I realised that I didn’t have time for my two loaves to rise, prove and bake. I know yeast dough will rise overnight in the fridge — I’ve done it several times — but a 20-hour fridge-based rise? Short of abandoning the opera (not an option) I didn’t have much choice in the matter.

Let’s just say that the dough rose nicely overnight, but the second rise, the one in the tins, took far, far longer than I thought it would, which meant spending most of the morning waiting to see if I’d get bread, or a doughy brick. But the yeast woke up in the end and I threw the loaves in the oven for the 45-plus minutes they took to cook. If truth be told I probably overdid the cooking by a minute or five — this bread is seriously crusty. But it’s good. So good that I ate the crust (with a smearing of home-made marmalade) and went straight back downstairs to hack off another slice to eat all by itself.

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Seriously seedy mixed grain bread (measurements were a little vague. It was one of those days)

A generous 6 cups of flour (I used about 2-1/2 white, 1-1/2 wholemeal, 1 rye and one wholewheat spelt)
Almost 3 cups of warm liquid (mostly water, plus almost half a cup of yogurt whey)
2 tsp dried yeast
1/4 cup honey
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp olive oil
1 generous cup of mixed seeds (poppy, sesame, sunflower, hemp and flax. I dry-roasted the sesame seeds first in a cast iron pan until they turned a few notches darker)

Mix the water, honey and yeast with half the flour and leave for a few minutes until it starts bubbling a little.

Add the rest of the flour and the salt and mix/knead until it’s springy. I’m guessing it was 10-15 minutes. Knead in the oil, and then the seeds.

Allow to rise (in a warm kitchen, or in my case in the fridge for a very, very long overnight).

Knock the dough down and put in greased loaf pans.

Allow to rise again.

Bake, at 425F for the first 15 minutes, and then at 375F for 30 minutes or so until the bread is sounds hollow when you take it out of the oven and tap the base. I like to put it back in the oven for another 5 minutes without the tins, just to firm up the crust a little. (Just don’t do as I did, and forget to take them out.)

Have the patience to wait for it to cool down before you cut and eat.

Of course, having started this bread to use up seeds, I bought both sesame and sunflower seeds to add to the variety, which is something else to use up. Anyone got sesame seed recipes? Things to cook with sunflower seeds?

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